Olive harvest, Part 2

After a busy day knocking ripe olives off the trees,  I  joined Vicente  following the truck on his way to the olive mill,  almazara  being its melodious name in Spanish, a name deeply rooted in the times when the lush Mediteranean hills were tended by the Arabs.  Though in a modern da almazara nothing is left of vintage millstones and slow motion, everything is efficient and fast, and just an hour after arrival the first canisters  are full to the brim with olive oil.

Vicente unloading the truck

Vicente unloading the truck

The mill surrounded by olive plantations

The mill surrounded by olive plantations

On their way to oil

On their way to oil

The area is dotted with smallholdings, so while I wait to see our olives on their way to be ground to oil, an incessant stream of small trucks and vans keeps delivering their loads of freshly picked olives. One by one, the smallholders  start collecting their oil and gather for some  small talk at the gates.

Olives of all shapes and colors

Olives of all shapes and colors

Nothing is left to chance, and a small food lab inside the  plant gives the producers detailed information on the quality of their crop.

Samples being collected

Samples being taken

Thorough quality control

Thorough quality control

After a couple of exhausting days, a happy Vicente collects his oil, which freshly pressed looks quite cloudy. After a few days it will have settled and show its shiny golden color. I got myself 15 liters and Vicente has been my supplier ever since: no way I will ever buy any olive oil at the supermarket!

Collecting the freshly pressed oil

Collecting the freshly pressed oil

The complete olive harvest series and my work on some other crops of traditional Mediterranean agriculture can be found HERE

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About Olaf Speier

Hello, thanks for taking a look ! When I am not traveling somewhere or into some art project, I devote my time to stock photography. This blog intends to give an insight into my current stock projects.
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